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Centralise stroke care 'in super units' call

Stroke care needs to be centralised in large specialist units in a radical shake-up of hospitals, experts say.

A study led by University College London found the overhaul of services in London which focused care at eight centres was saving 96 lives a year.

In comparison less far-reaching changes in Greater Manchester had less impact.

England's national stroke director Prof Tony Rudd said the research showed centralisation of care should now be spread to all urban areas.

How emergency care is organised is a pressing issue in the health service.

Last year NHS England proposed creating a network of major centres to do the most complex care.

This has already started for stroke with London and Greater Manchester undergoing reorganisations in recent years.

To read the full article please click here.

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Statins: Millions more to get drugs in controversial plans

Doctors have been told to offer cholesterol-lowering statins to millions more people in a massive and controversial expansion in prescribing.

Four in 10 adults in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are now eligible for statins, even though many are at low risk of a heart attack or stroke.

The medicines regulator, NICE, says it will save lives.

There has been vocal opposition to the plans, and doctors' leaders said they had no confidence in the decision.

But all sides of the debate say people who are already taking statins should continue to take their medication.

Major issue

Cardiovascular disease - which includes heart attacks and strokes - is the UK's biggest killer.

It claims 180,000 lives a year and is behind one in three deaths.

Statins reduce the build-up of fatty-plaques that lead to blockages in blood vessels.

To read more, please click here.

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Hospitals get guidelines on safe nurse numbers

Hospitals in England are being given strict guidelines on safe staffing levels for nurses - but they stop short of giving absolute minimums.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence said having more than eight patients to one nurse on a ward in the day should act as a trigger for checking if care was being compromised.

It also set out a series of "red flag" events that should prompt concern.

The government said the move was a "major step forward".

The guidelines cover problems with basic care such as delays getting pain relief.

Other events include patients not being helped on a visit to the bathroom or not receiving their medication.

Both patients and nurses on wards can raise these. They must then be investigated and explanations provided for what has gone wrong.

To read more click here.

Posted by: Susie Melsome on July 15th, 2014 @ 08:57 AM
Tagged with: Nurse, nursing

 
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One in three Alzheimer's cases preventable, says research

One in three cases of Alzheimer's disease worldwide is preventable, according to research from the University of Cambridge.

The main risk factors for the disease are a lack of exercise, smoking, depression and poor education, it says.

Previous research from 2011 put the estimate at one in two cases, but this new study takes into account overlapping risk factors.

Alzheimer's Research UK said age was still the biggest risk factor.

Click here to read more about this. 

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NHS to give patients cash to purchase their own healthcare

Billions of pounds of health service and town hall budgets are to be given to the most vulnerable patients to purchase health and social care services in the community, under plans unveiled by the NHS's new head.

The elderly, disabled children and those with serious mental illness or learning disabilities will from next April be offered individual pots of money to spend as they wish on health and social care services such as carers, physiotherapists and psychotherapy sessions.

Simon Stevens, NHS England's chief executive, said that it would help keep people out of hospital and ultimately save money, the Guardianreported.

Some patients' budgets will range from as little as a few hundred pounds, though most are likely to get more than £1,000, with a small number who have very complex needs receiving substantially more than that.

Patients receiving the funds would still get free GP and hospital care. Recipients will not automatically receive cash payments into their bank accounts but will control the budget, which will be provided after a care plan is agreed with their doctors.

To read the full article please click here.

 

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