homehome2menu22instagramlinkedin22facebook2twitter2google-plussearch2triangle-righttriangle-leftbubble22bubble2bubblesdrawerhistorystats-barsfeed2file-emptycheckmark2infochevron-with-circle-right
Menu Job Search

Showing posts tagged with: government

Adult social care 'under pressure', report says

Adult social care in England is under increasing pressure and the government has "no idea" how long the system can cope, according to an official inquiry.

The National Audit Office also raised doubts over whether an overhaul of care services, which begins in 2015, will be as successful as ministers hope.

A lack of time and information could leave councils struggling to improve services, the report added.

Ministers say they are giving councils £1.1 billion to protect such services.

The NAO found that while demand for adult social care was increasing, spending by local authorities fell by 8% in real terms between 2010-11 and 2012-13.

Some of this was achieved by delivering care more efficiently, but researchers also found evidence that councils paid providers less, putting financial pressures on some companies who complained of being able to deliver only basic care.

Click here to read the full article.

Posted by: on March 13th, 2014 @ 08:37 AM

'Early access' drugs scheme launched for severely ill

Severely ill patients and those with rare debilitating conditions could be given new medicines years before they are licensed, under new regulations.

The Early Access to Medicines scheme would enable a small number of promising medicines to be fast-tracked.

The idea is to help patients in England with severe illnesses who have no other treatment options.

The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will oversee the scheme, being launched in April.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said: "What patients want is sometimes to try medicines that may not be clinically proven to be effective but are clinically safe.

"We are streamlining the process so these medicines can be used much earlier - particularly if they have early promise - and that is something which will bring hope to a lot of patients."

Click here to read the full article.

Posted by: on March 14th, 2014 @ 08:14 AM

NHS told to streamline 'complicated' complaints process

The complaints system for the NHS in England is "hopelessly complicated" and needs an overhaul, according to the patients' watchdog.

Healthwatch England says more than 70 organisations are involved in dealing with complaints about the NHS and social care.

It wants the process to be simplified to ensure patients get more support.

NHS England says it is committed to improving how complaints are handled and is piloting a new approach.

Several inquiries have highlighted failings in the complaints systems for health and social care, and the dangers of failing to heed patients' concerns.

Now Healthwatch England's review of the complaints system - based on public responses to its survey - has discovered there are up to 75 different types of organisation involved in the process.

Initially, health and care providers - including hospitals, GP practices and care homes - or their commissioning bodies can be challenged.

Read more about this here.

Posted by: on March 20th, 2014 @ 08:37 AM

NHS fraud and error 'costing the UK £7bn a year'

Fraud is costing the NHS £5bn a year, with a further £2bn lost to errors, the former head of its anti-fraud section says.

The amount lost to fraud alone could pay for nearly 250,000 new nurses, a report seen by Panorama suggests.

The NHS must "get on with tackling the problem", said Jim Gee, co-author of the Portsmouth University study and ex-director of NHS Counter Fraud Services.

The Department of Health said it "did not recognise" the figures.

The amount estimated by Mr Gee, who led the NHS anti-fraud section for eight years, is 20 times that recorded in the government's annual fraud indicator report.

Full more details click here.

Posted by: on March 24th, 2014 @ 08:49 AM

Child mental health issues 'missed'

Thousands of young people may be "slipping through the net" because adults do not spot the warning signs of mental health problems, experts warn.

MindEd, a new website, backed by groups including the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, is being launched to raise awareness.

A survey of 2,100 adults found a third were unsure of signs of depression in children.

More than 850,000 children in the UK have a mental health problem.

The survey, carried out on behalf of the child and adolescent mental health groups behind MindEd, also found half of those questioned would be worried about saying anything if they did suspect there was a problem, for fear of being mistaken.

POSSIBLE WARNING SIGNS

  • Loss of appetite or weight loss
  • Waking early
  • Excessive boredom
  • Poor concentration

Two-thirds would back extra government investment in children's mental health services to equip professionals with the skills to identify and treat these children earlier.

Posted by: on March 25th, 2014 @ 09:43 AM

Autism 'begins long before birth'

Scientists say they have new evidence that autism begins in the womb.

Patchy changes in the developing brain long before birth may cause symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), research suggests.

The study, in the New England Journal of Medicine, raises hopes that better understanding of the brain may improve the lives of children with autism.

It reinforces the need for early identification and treatment, says a University of California team.

Click here to read the full article.

Posted by: on March 27th, 2014 @ 10:05 AM

Smoking bans cut asthma and premature births by 10%, study says

Laws banning smoking in public places have had a positive impact on child health, an international study in the Lancet suggests.

Researchers found a 10% reduction in premature births and severe childhood asthma attacks within a year of smoke-free laws being introduced.

A research team analysed 11 previous studies from North America and Europe.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists said smoking bans benefitted adults and children.

Click here to read the full article.

Posted by: on March 28th, 2014 @ 11:12 AM

Breast cancer survivors 'do not exercise enough'

Exercise can aid recovery after breast cancer but many women are not active enough, a study suggests.

Being active is known to be beneficial but US researchers, writing in the journal Cancer, said they had found many women did too little.

Only a third met recommended activity levels.

UK breast cancer groups said women here also needed more support to keep active after having the disease.

To read more about this please click here

Posted by: on June 9th, 2014 @ 09:22 AM

Autism costs '£32bn per year' in UK

The economic cost of supporting someone with autism over a lifetime is much higher than previously thought, research suggests.

It amounts to £1.5m in the UK and $2.4m in the US for individuals with the highest needs, say UK and US experts.

Autism cost the UK more than heart disease, stroke and cancer combined, said an autism charity.

But only £6.60 per person is spent on autism research compared with £295 on cancer, according to Autistica.

The research looked at the costs to society of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in both the UK and US.

Posted by: on June 10th, 2014 @ 09:35 AM

Mental health services 'a car crash'

Mental health services in England are "a car crash" and the health secretary is not taking the problems seriously, according to the outgoing president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

Prof Sue Bailey told BBC News mental health services were "in crisis".

She said Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt had a basic understanding of mental health, but had not made it a priority.

Mr Hunt rejected this, saying he had made it a priority and that he visited the front line of the NHS most weeks.

To read more, please click here.

Posted by: on June 24th, 2014 @ 11:21 AM

Leading health experts in NHS funding debate call

Leading figures from the health world are calling for a national debate on how the NHS in England is funded.

In a letter to The Times, they say challenges from an ageing population mean the system is "creaking at the seams" and cannot continue as it is.

Signatories include the heads of the Royal College of Physicians and Royal College of Nursing.

The BBC's health editor says the group feels future options may include higher taxes or charges for some treatment.

Without action an extra £30bn will be needed by 2020 to fund the NHS at current levels, their letter adds.

They are asking for a cross-party, independent conversation on the way forward for the "scope, provision and funding of health and social care".

To read the full article please click here.

Posted by: on July 7th, 2014 @ 09:15 AM

Alzheimer's research in 'major step' towards blood test

British scientists have made a "major step forward" in developing a blood test to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

Research in more than 1,000 people has identified a set of proteins in the blood which can predict the start of the dementia with 87% accuracy.

The findings, published in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia, will be used to improve trials for new dementia drugs.

Experts warned that the test was not yet ready for doctors' surgeries.

Research into treatments for Alzheimer's disease has been plagued by failure. Between 2002 and 2012, 99.6% of trials aimed at preventing or reversing the disease flopped.

Doctors believe the failure is down to treating patients when it is already too late, since symptoms appear around a decade after the start of the disease.

Identifying patients earlier is one of the priorities for dementia research.

To read the full article please click here.

Posted by: on July 8th, 2014 @ 08:53 AM

NHS to give patients cash to purchase their own healthcare

Billions of pounds of health service and town hall budgets are to be given to the most vulnerable patients to purchase health and social care services in the community, under plans unveiled by the NHS's new head.

The elderly, disabled children and those with serious mental illness or learning disabilities will from next April be offered individual pots of money to spend as they wish on health and social care services such as carers, physiotherapists and psychotherapy sessions.

Simon Stevens, NHS England's chief executive, said that it would help keep people out of hospital and ultimately save money, the Guardianreported.

Some patients' budgets will range from as little as a few hundred pounds, though most are likely to get more than £1,000, with a small number who have very complex needs receiving substantially more than that.

Patients receiving the funds would still get free GP and hospital care. Recipients will not automatically receive cash payments into their bank accounts but will control the budget, which will be provided after a care plan is agreed with their doctors.

To read the full article please click here.

 

Posted by: on July 10th, 2014 @ 10:31 AM

Statins: Millions more to get drugs in controversial plans

Doctors have been told to offer cholesterol-lowering statins to millions more people in a massive and controversial expansion in prescribing.

Four in 10 adults in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are now eligible for statins, even though many are at low risk of a heart attack or stroke.

The medicines regulator, NICE, says it will save lives.

There has been vocal opposition to the plans, and doctors' leaders said they had no confidence in the decision.

But all sides of the debate say people who are already taking statins should continue to take their medication.

Major issue

Cardiovascular disease - which includes heart attacks and strokes - is the UK's biggest killer.

It claims 180,000 lives a year and is behind one in three deaths.

Statins reduce the build-up of fatty-plaques that lead to blockages in blood vessels.

To read more, please click here.

Posted by: on July 18th, 2014 @ 09:52 AM

Centralise stroke care 'in super units' call

Stroke care needs to be centralised in large specialist units in a radical shake-up of hospitals, experts say.

A study led by University College London found the overhaul of services in London which focused care at eight centres was saving 96 lives a year.

In comparison less far-reaching changes in Greater Manchester had less impact.

England's national stroke director Prof Tony Rudd said the research showed centralisation of care should now be spread to all urban areas.

How emergency care is organised is a pressing issue in the health service.

Last year NHS England proposed creating a network of major centres to do the most complex care.

This has already started for stroke with London and Greater Manchester undergoing reorganisations in recent years.

To read the full article please click here.

Posted by: on August 6th, 2014 @ 09:15 AM

Chief medical officer: Make mental health bigger priority

Mental health needs to be more of a priority, with targets for waiting times and more protection for funding, says England's chief medical officer.

Dame Sally Davies said there were signs funding was being cut at a time when the cost to the economy was rising.

Her annual report said mental illness led to the loss of 70 million working days last year - up 24% since 2009.

As well as calling for greater emphasis on mental illness in the NHS, she also said employers could play a role too.

She recommended they allowed people with mental health problems the option of flexible working to keep them in employment and maintaining regular contact during sickness leave.

Overall, mental illness costs the economy between £70bn and £100bn in lost productivity, benefit payments and absence from work.

To read the full article click here.

Posted by: on September 9th, 2014 @ 08:59 AM

Dementia patients 'face unfair care tax'

Dementia patients in the UK face a "care tax" because they are left to sort out much of the care they need themselves, experts say.

The Alzheimer's Society found that on average, the equivalent of £32,242 a year was spent on care per patient.

But the researchers said on average only a third - £10,784 - came from NHS or council funds, leaving a shortfall.

The charity said it was unfair as those with cancer or heart problems got their care free on the NHS.

To read the full article please click here.

Posted by: on September 10th, 2014 @ 08:45 AM

'Cuts forcing English councils to limit social care'

Almost 90% of councils in England no longer offer social care to people whose needs are ranked low to moderate, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (Adass) has said.

The group is warning cuts are making the care system "unsustainable".

The government says councils have been given an extra £1.1bn to help protect social care this year.

But charities say hundreds of thousands of people are struggling without help.

When someone applies for social care, their needs are determined as either critical, substantial, moderate or low.

In recent years the number of councils able to help those at the lower end of the scale has gone down as they struggle to balance their budgets.

To read more about this, please click here.

Posted by: on September 15th, 2014 @ 08:42 AM

Can technology help defuse the dementia time bomb?

Dementia is not a natural part of ageing. It is an umbrella term for the symptoms of around 100 different brain diseases, that cause problems with memory, language skills, mental agility, understanding and judgement. Alzheimer's is the most common, accounting for nearly two-thirds of cases.

44 million people worldwide now have dementia, and this figure is expected to triple by 2050, as the global population ages. In the UK alone, dementia currently affects more than 800,000 people, with the annual cost of care per person greater than the average salary.

Although some medical treatments do slow the progression of some types of dementia, there is currently no cure. Round-the-clock help is often needed, but for many a live-in carer is not practical or affordable. So scientists have started to look at ways that technology can support people with dementia and help them live independently for as long as possible.

For the full article click here.

Posted by: on September 16th, 2014 @ 08:37 AM

Is it time for a mental health waiting target?

Waiting time targets have become synonymous with the NHS in England. They apply to everything from A&E units and ambulance calls outs to routine surgery and cancer treatment.

But it's not just an English phenomenon. Other countries in the UK have introduced their own.

The exception is mental health. It should come as no surprise - mental health care is often said to be the poor cousin of the NHS family. Figures show that the condition gets 11% of the budget, but accounts for 28% of the disease burden.

The result is that many people go without help. An estimated three quarters of people with a mental illness receive no treatment. For physical disorders, the rate is nearer a quarter.

To read the full article click here.

Posted by: on September 17th, 2014 @ 08:44 AM

NHS and social care 'at breaking point', medics and charities warn

The NHS and social care services are "at breaking point", a group of leading medical groups and charities have said.

Writing in the Independent, they said the NHS had been through its "longest and most damaging budget squeeze" ever.

The letter says patient care and staff morale have suffered, adding: "Things cannot go on like this."

It is addressed to the leaders of the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats - all three parties have made major NHS pledges in recent days.

Leading figures from the British Medical Association, the Royal College of Nursing, the Royal College of Midwives, the Alzheimer's Society, the Teenage Cancer Trust and the Faculty of Public Health are among those who have signed the letter.

To read the full article, please click here.

Posted by: on October 6th, 2014 @ 08:59 AM

Mental health: Pilots to help people find work launched

The government has launched four pilot schemes to help unemployed people with mental health problems find work.

The voluntary scheme will see some people on Employment and Support Allowance being offered employment support and psychiatric help.

The £2m pilots, all in England, will run for six months.

Ministers say they are not a precursor to forcing unemployed people with mental health problems to seek help in order to keep their benefits.

Last month, the Chief Medical Officer, Dame Sally Davies, said that mental health problems are costing the economy up to £100bn per annum.

Nearly half of ESA claimants (46%) have mental health problems.

The pilots are running in

  • Durham & Tees Valley
  • Shropshire/Telford
  • Sussex
  • Wolverhampton

To read the full article click here.

Posted by: on October 7th, 2014 @ 08:40 AM

Green tea compound may improve cancer drugs

"Green tea could helps scientists develop new cancer fighting drugs," the Mail Online reports. But before you rush out to the shops, in no way does this study suggest green tea can fight cancer!

To read the full article please click here

 

Posted by: on October 9th, 2014 @ 09:44 AM

Does wellbeing improve your mental health?

The importance of mental wellbeing has gained significant support in recent times. But does it protect against mental illness?

"If I do things that will make me happier," the logic goes, "I am less likely to experience mental health difficulties."

To read more about this, please click here.

Posted by: on October 9th, 2014 @ 3:25 PM

Care plan savings 'over-optimistic'

Questions are being asked about what impact a flagship government scheme to improve the care of vulnerable patients in England will have.

The £5.3bn Better Care Fund will be launched in April 2015 to encourage greater integration between the NHS and social care.

But a review by the National Audit Office found the scale of potential savings was overstated to start with.

The government said it disagreed with the criticisms.

However, the NAO said even now, the revised plans contained "bold assumptions".

Last month, ministers championed the impact the fund was going to have after announcing nearly all 151 local plans had been signed off.

The details of the schemes vary, but all involve some form of joint working between social workers, nurses and other community staff to improve the support offered, particularly to elderly people.

To read more please click here.

Posted by: on November 11st, 2014 @ 12:21 AM

Some patients 'struggling to book with GP', watchdog says

Too many patients are struggling to book GP appointments in England, the health watchdog has told the BBC.

Patients at one in six surgeries have problems booking appointments, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) said after an inspection of 336 practices.

The watchdog also raised concerns over variations in how serious incidents were reported and investigated.

Prof Steve Field, the CQC's chief inspector of GPs, said most practices offered safe and effective care.

"We believe that the vast majority of GP surgeries in England are providing good care for their patients but unfortunately the vast majority are being let down by a small minority and unfortunately, we have seen some examples in our pilot phase of some really poor care," he said.

"What I want is that all patients have access to really good care wherever they are and we will make sure that happens."

The CQC said some practices did not have robust and consistent systems for reporting incidents, or a culture of identifying where things had gone wrong and learning from them.

To read more please click here.

Posted by: on November 17th, 2014 @ 08:41 AM

Suicide risk reduced after talk therapy, study suggests

Talk therapy sessions can help reduce the risk of suicide among high-risk groups, suggests a US study.

Researchers from John Hopkins University tracked more than 5,000 Danish people who had attempted suicide and later received psychosocial counselling.

They found suicides went down by 26% after five years, compared to people who had no therapy sessions.

To read more please click here.

Posted by: on November 24th, 2014 @ 10:14 AM

Huddles 'help children's hospital care'

It's good to talk, we're always told. And now child health expert Dr Peter Lachman says "huddles" - informal meetings of hospital staff - are a simple way of improving children's hospital care.

A lot can be said for good communication - it's a simple art which if done properly can build and maintain strong relationships, improve efficiency and most of all, improve outcomes.

Done badly, it can cause uncertainty and confusion.

In healthcare, good communication is essential if we are to ensure best practice and offer patients, regardless of postcode, access to safe, high quality care at the earliest opportunity.

To read more please click here.

Posted by: on December 2nd, 2014 @ 09:34 AM

'Take care complaints more seriously,' regulator says

Complaints about health and social care should be taken more seriously, says the Care Quality Commission regulator.

Its report said there was a wide variation in the way complaints were handled across the NHS, primary care and adult social care services in England.

Too often people were met with a "defensive culture", the report said.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has welcomed the move to improve care and said progress had been made.

To read the full article please click here

Posted by: on December 8th, 2014 @ 10:20 AM

NHS satisfaction 'risen significantly'

Public satisfaction with the NHS has "risen significantly", according to analysis of the influential British Social Attitudes survey.

Of nearly 2,000 people surveyed, 65% were "very" or "quite" satisfied with the NHS.

It is the second highest recorded level, and outright "dissatisfaction" is at an all-time low of 15%.

A BBC/Populus poll this week suggested the NHS was the most important issue ahead of the general election, in May.

The British Social Attitudes survey, conducted by NatCen Social Research, took place in the autumn, well before the widely reported problems in A&E this winter.

It showed public satisfaction at 65% compared with 60% in 2013.

The analysis of the data, by the King's Fund health think tank, showed:

  • GPs had the highest level of satisfaction, although the figure of 71% is the lowest recorded
  • Satisfaction in A&E stood at 58% and at 69% in out-patient services
  • With dentists the figure was 54%
  • Meanwhile, just 31% were happy with social care services

 

To read the full article please click here.

Posted by: on January 30th, 2015 @ 11:18 AM

Care services facing cuts this year

Care services are facing cuts this year as rises in council tax have failed to plug the gaps in budgets in England, town hall chiefs are warning.

The government allowed councils to increase council tax by 2% this year to spend on care - and most have done so. But, according to a survey of all 151 social care directors, there is still a shortfall of nearly £1bn.

.

Posted by: Sharon Tither on July 13th, 2016 @ 10:13 AM

Mental health budgets 'still being cut despite pledge'

Despite government assurances they would be funded on a par with physical healthcare, mental health trusts in England are still having their budgets cut, figures suggest.

Posted by: Sharon Tither on October 14th, 2016 @ 7:36 PM

Recruitment Fair

Come along and join our recruitment team from Preston & Blackpool at Lancashire  Jobcentre on Thursday 7 September 2017.

 

Posted by: Sharon Tither on June 20th, 2017 @ 10:42 AM
Instagram LinkedIn Twitter Facebook