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Nurses' anger over 'unfair' pay deal

There is a "real sense of anger" among nurses in England about an "unfair" pay offer, nurse leaders are warning.

Royal College of Nursing general secretary Peter Carter said a government decision to block an across-the-board 1% rise could dominate the union's annual conference this week.

He even said he could not rule out calls for industrial action.

In March, the Department of Health said staff entitled to progression-in-the-job increases would not get the rise.

The automatic increases are designed to reward professional development. They are given to half of all NHS staff and are worth more than 3% on average.

But the government rejected recommendations from the independent pay review body for the across-the-board rise to be given to all staff in 2014-15.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said implementing the pay body's recommendations would be "unaffordable and would risk the quality of patient care" as nursing jobs would have to be cut if everyone in the NHS got the 1% rise.

In contrast, the Scottish Government has accepted the 1% recommendation. Talks are on-going in Wales and Northern Ireland.

So far the RCN has not called for industrial action, unlike Unison and Unite which have both balloted members.

But Mr Carter said he could not rule out emergency motions at the four-day conference which gets under way in Liverpool later.

He told the BBC pay would be a "topic of hot discussion".

He said the anger was fuelled by what appeared to be a growing pay bill for senior NHS managers.

To read the full article please click here.

Posted by: on June 16th, 2014 @ 09:23 AM

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